Home

Pacific NW News

Hawai`i News

Hawaiian History
Hana Ho`omake`aka
Laugh Corner
Kama`aina Profile
Music
Foodstuffs
Where in the World?
Holoholo
Nā Mana`o Ulu Wale
I kēlā me kēia mana`o
Photo Gallery
Letters
From the Editor
About Us
Contact Us

Serving all who love Hawai`i

November 2007

The Hawai`i Nisei Veterans' Story

Digital Storytelling for Americans of Japanese Ancestry during World War II

By Shari Y. Tamashiro

 

Kalākaua Returns to His One Hānau (place of birth)…

David La‘amea Kamanakapu‘u Mahinulani Naloia‘ehuokalani Lumialani Kalākaua was born on November 16, 1836. During his reign as king, the Hawaiian Kingdom experienced the revival of Hawaiian cultural traditions, the building of a royal palace that included electricity for the first time in the Islands and the first Hawaiian monarch to travel around the world.

 

 

$3 Golf

It’s always nice to find a story that brightens the grey and wet days of Seattle’s autumn. So imagine my delight when I read that Maui’s Waiehu Municipal Golf Course announced a $3 rate for nine holes of golf. Golf is never $3. Miniature golf costs more than that.

Haleakalā Bike Tours Suspended

Riding down the steep, winding road on a bicycle from the summit of Haleakalā on Maui is a popular activity for tourists. Roughly 90,000 thrill-seekers pay $100 - $150 for a ride in a van to the 10,000 foot summit and then coast the narrow road down on a bike.

 

 

Music: New Releases

Every month Gregg reviews newly released Hawaiian CDs. Read about your favorite artist or explore the Hawaiian music scene.

The Events Calendar

Find out about upcoming events in our events calendar!

Hawaiian Paniolo Honored

Ikua Purdy, Hawaiian paniolo who epitomized the skills and romance connected with the American West, was recently inducted into the Cheyenne Frontier Days Old West Museum Hall of Fame.

 

 

From the Editor

We hope you are enjoying our November issue, a month when we always honor the birth of Kalākaua, the last male monarch of Hawai`i who did much to restore some of the Hawaiian traditions that had gone underground because of suppression by outside forces.

Kama`āina Profile: Ricky Chang

They call it the Blue Bridge Bash because it is located close to the blue colored bridge that spans the mighty Columbia River and connects Kennewick, WA to its sister Tri-Cities town of Pasco, WA. What began many years ago as a small, backyard gathering of a dozen or so East of the Cascade Mountains Hawaiian Islander musicians/dancers and their ohana has slowly but surely evolved into the biggest such event in Eastern Washington!

 

Holoholo:

I have lost a man I considered my mentor and we/the Pacific NW Hawaiian community have lost a truly great friend as Ahoi Sabu Simeona and his wife Billie have decided to follow their hearts and move back to a retirement home for Hawaiians in Waimanalo!

Foodstuffs: Easy as Pie

November is the month for pie. Oh sure, there’s turkey too, but there’s just so much you can do with that big bird – roast, rotisserie, maybe deep fry. Nobody boils it do they?

Nā Mana`o Ulu Wale

Auwe! The Hawai`i Superferry sure had a short life before 249 mostly part time employees were laid off and the state-of-the-art catamaran found a permanent run at the dock in Honolulu. So what’s the pilikia?

Alaska Air Inaugurates Service to Hawai`i

Alaska Airlines recently inaugurated service to Hawaii, operating its first daily nonstop flight between Seattle and Honolulu.

NEW NEW NEW Audio Clips

Listen to audio clips from some stories in the Northwest Hawai`i Times. Here's a couple but going get sah mo' bumbye!

Old Hawai`i: Pictures from the Past

Remember this?
It's the vegetable wagon, one of the main ways we used to get fresh vegetables. This photo was sent in by Elliott Manning of Yakima, Washington who was born in Hawai`i. It is from the collection of his mother Maile Jean, who now lives in Port Angeles, Washington.

A Note about the Type

Pepa Stuff

Northwest Hawai`i Times is a free, monthly newpaper published at the beginning of every month. If you have any leads for stories, call (206) 599-6326, mail to NWHIT, P.O. Box 14376, Seattle, WA 98114 or send an email to nwhit1@northwesthawaiitimes.com.

For comments or questions about the website, email webmaster@northwesthawaiitimes.com.

For advertising in the paper, click here.

Copies are available at many locations around Puget Sound. To find a copy near you, call (206) 599-6326 or email locations@northwesthawaiitimes.com.

Archived Covers

For convenient access to the web content of previous issues of the Northwest Hawai`i Times, you can search the archives via publication date.

 

Copyright © 2004-2009 by Northwest Hawai`i Times
All Rights Reserved