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June 2006

From the Editor...

 

Rochelle delaCruz

June is the month of celebrations and we have quite a few to report. We commend Ivan Kealoha and his good work for colleagues at Naval Station Everett. Mahalo to Clay Young for sharing his artistic vision at `Imiloa and beyond. And congratulations to all the students who have finished one kind of learning and are heading out to another! Lots accomplished…but still lots to do, so always happy to see everyone working hard.

Mahalo also to the Office of Hawaiian Affairs who sent members up here to the Continent to keep us informed. I attended the meeting in Seattle and heard thoughtful questions and comments about Kau Inoa and the Akaka Bill from the group. I noted Haunani Apoliona and Clyde Namu`o’s willingness to wrestle respectfully with the more difficult ones and appreciated that they didn’t digress or use political double-speak. They have taken a strong position and are able to clearly articulate and support it. We should do the same as we struggle to come to our own conclusions and state our opinions. They handed out three versions of the Akaka Bill side-by-side and highlighted the changes, making it easy to see how it has evolved. They also didn’t give the Bill blanket approval and acknowledged those parts they didn’t like, with the explanation that first it gets passed, and then fine-tuned. If you would like a copy of their Side-by-Side, I’m sure they’ll be happy to send it to you. (See OHA contact information)

I am also intrigued by OHA’s efforts to restore the traditional cultural practice of Kūkulu Kumuhana. In some of my recent columns, I’ve been wailing about problems in the Islands and wringing my hands…what to do, what to do? So as we’re figuring it out, here is one thing we can actually do: a simultaneous meditation for Hawaiian justice. I have a long way to go in order to quiet down my noisy mind but I keep trying, so am grateful to have another way to work on it. This tradition has immediate applications in other challenges, such as the upcoming Kamehameha Schools Appeals case.

So why not…what’s to lose? ~RdC

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